A Tale of Ice and Fire: Dan Lippel’s “Mirrored Spaces”


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This double album by guitarist, composer, producer, etc. Dan Lippel is sort of his Yellow Brick Road, an album which listeners of a certain age know well.  Elton John’s album was more about dropping the shackles of adolescence and conformity but Mirrored Spaces is more about setting aside the shackles of Lippel’s very busy life with ICE (The International Contemporary Ensemble), Flexible Music, and the daunting task of producing for (the also very busy and wonderful) New Focus Records.  Here he presents a virtual manifesto of works for solo guitar with electronics which, if only by proximity of release date, suggests a comparison with Jennifer Koh’s Limitless.

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Promo photo from the artist’s web site

The present disc is at once a virtual CV of his interests as performer and composer as well as a forward looking compilation by which future new chamber music with guitar will be compared.  It is a collection which looks like he culled the best of his current working repertoire to present a sort of photograph of his vision.

The two discs are actually an overwhelming listening experience of new material.  Here are the tracks:

01 Amorphose 2
Amorphose 2
Daniel Lippel, guitarPhilip White, live electronics 7:13
02 Aphorisms: Whom the Gods…
Aphorisms: Whom the Gods…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 0:52

Mirrored Spaces

Orianna Webb (b. 1974)/Daniel Lippel (b. 1976)

Daniel Lippel, guitar
03 I. Refracted
I. Refracted
4:41
04 II. Sturdy
II. Sturdy
4:03
05 III. Cadences
III. Cadences
4:17
06 IV. Reflected
IV. Reflected
2:00
07 V. Rondo
V. Rondo
4:20
08 VI. Song
VI. Song
4:58
09 Aphorisms: When Music Itself…
Aphorisms: When Music Itself…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 0:57
10 Descent
Descent
Daniel Lippel, guitar 10:34
11 Aphorisms: Solon the Lawmaker…
Aphorisms: Solon the Lawmaker…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 0:45
12 Primo cum lumine solis
Primo cum lumine solis
Daniel Lippel, guitar 3:43
13 Aphorisms: It Needs a Body…
Aphorisms: It Needs a Body…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 1:01
14 Like Minds
Like Minds
Daniel Lippel, guitar 11:48
15 From Scratch
From Scratch
Daniel Lippel, guitarSergio Kafejian, electronics 11:18
16 Aphorisms: Whosoever is Delighted…
Aphorisms: Whosoever is Delighted…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 1:23
17 Detroit Rain Song Graffiti
Detroit Rain Song Graffiti
Daniel Lippel, guitar 6:02
18 Aphorisms: We Seek Destruction…
Aphorisms: We Seek Destruction…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 1:11

Partita

Douglas Boyce (b. 1970)

Daniel Lippel, guitar
19 I. Cumiliform
I. Cumiliform
2:50
20 II. Galante
II. Galante
1:37
21 III. Empfindsamer (offstage)
III. Empfindsamer (offstage)
3:10
22 IV: Air de cour
IV: Air de cour
3:15
23 V. Brise
V. Brise
2:32
24 Aphorisms: There is No Excellent Beauty…
Aphorisms: There is No Excellent Beauty…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 1:56
25 Joie Divisions
Joie Divisions
Daniel Lippel, guitar 6:54
26 Aphorisms: Man Comes into the World…
Aphorisms: Man Comes into the World…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 1:19
27 Arc of Infinity
Arc of Infinity
Daniel Lippel, guitarChristopher Bailey, electronics 16:27
28 Aphorisms: Love is Necessarily…
Aphorisms: Love is Necessarily…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 1:43
29 Scaffold (live)
Scaffold (live)
Daniel Lippel, guitar 7:00

Its easy to see the richness and complexity of this release from the track listing alone.  Having already demonstrated his facility with minimalist classics like his wonderful recording of Steve Reich’s Electric Counterpoint he presents selections from what appears to be his current active repertoire.  It is a joy to see the diversity of composers he has chosen.  Clearly he confronts the new and technically challenging works with the same zeal with which he approaches his various other responsibilities as performer and producer.  We even get to hear some of his chops as a composer in the live recording of Scaffold as well as his collaborative work with Oriana Webb on the eponymous Mirrored Spaces.  These are unusual works, not the “usual suspects” nor the latest rage but new and interesting music.  Even the presentation of Kyle Bartlett’s pithy Aphorisms are scattered among the other tracks like pepper on your salad at a restaurant (personally my obsessive nature wants to re-order these tracks in sequence) demonstrating a sensitivity to alternate ways to present music.

I have at best a passing knowledge of most of these composers having heard some of the work of Douglas Boyce and some of Kyle Bartlett.  I know Ryan Streber via his work as a recording engineer.  the rest of the names are new to these ears.  And that is exactly the point of this wonderful collection.  I really can’t say much useful about the individual pieces except to say that they are compelling listening.  The liner notes included in the CD release are useful and informative.  (Now last I looked the CD version is not available on Amazon so you will have to go to Bandcamp to order it but I highly recommend it for the notes alone.)  Many of these pieces will have a significant performance life and you heard them here first.  Much as Jennifer Koh defines new collaborative adventures in Limitless with her trusty violin, Lippel brings his axe down on some challenging but substantive music in this forward looking collection.

Douglas Boyce New and Exciting Chamber Music


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The rather plain cover belies the contents of this album of exciting and powerful chamber music.  This is billed as a “sampler” album and it contains three works by Douglas Boyce (1970- ).  He is a founding member, curator, and composer-in-residence of counter)induction, a composer/performer collective active in the New York region.  He also has experience playing in various punk bands.

Boyce holds a B.A. in Physics and Music from Williams College, an M.M. from the University of Oregon and a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania (1999).  He has studied with George Crumb, James Primosch, Kathryn Alexander, Robert Kyr, Judith Weir, Ladislav Kubik and Robert Suderburg.  He currently serves as Associate Professor of Music at the George Washington University in Washington, DC.

All this gives only the faintest hint of what his music sounds like.  In the three works represented here the listener will notice some influence of Bartok and mid-century modernism.  The first work “102nd and Amsterdam” (2005)  reflects a composer well schooled in writing for string instruments.  This piece is a string trio played by members of the Aeolus Quartet (Rachel Shapiro, violin; Greg Luce, viola; Alan Richardson, cello) and they are given a great deal to do.  This is an energetic piece which engages the listener immediately and doesn’t really let go until the end some 14 plus minutes later.

The writing is virtuosic and the variety of techniques employed in his string writing are engaging and never seem gratuitous (i.e. extended techniques because I can).  Despite multiple glissandi and other string effects the work, like the others on the album, are basically using the tonal language common to most western music.  This is seriously engaging and masterfully developed music.  It hooked this listener immediately.

The second work is Piano Quartet No. 1 (2009).  This is an even more visceral work true to Bartokian esthetics.  In its relatively brief 8 plus minutes the listener is taken on a virtuosic journey by the musicians of counter)induction (Jessica Meyer, viola; Sumire Kudo, cello; Steve Beck, piano)  They are joined by the wonderful Miranda Cuckson who steps out of her soloist role and moves deftly into this chamber group as the finest musicians can do.  Boyce cites influences as diverse as Robert Fripp and King Crimson but the details of that are not necessarily clear to this writer nor is it necessary to the appreciation of the work.  It is a powerful and exciting piece of chamber music.  This work left this listener a bit tired by the end (it is quite a workout) but the same ability to sustain interest and attention which applied to the first work is also present here.

Finally the Trio Cavatina (Harumi Rhodes, violin; Priscilla Lee, cello; leva Jokubaviciute, piano) presents a reading of the four movement “Fortuitous Variations” (2014).  This most recent composition is the big work on this disc.  The underpinnings, if you will, involve philosophical ideas and are elaborated well by the composer on his web site but, like the influences of the previous work, the music stands very well on it’s own.

There are four movements which seem to correspond (at least roughly) to the sonata form commonly used in such works.  Each maintains it’s character as said variations are rolled out and, as in the previous works, sustains interest easily.  This is perhaps a more ponderous work which is less direct than the previous two pieces but this most recent composition no doubt reflects the composer’s development and time will tell what direction his work will take.  There is, however, a sense that the composer has developed a personal style and is cultivating it.  Give a listen.

Most will want to hear these works multiple times.  This reviewer managed to find three separate drives which allowed uninterrupted listening to the entire disc and I know those three won’t be the last.