The Lincoln Trio: Trios for Big Shoulders


Cedille CDR 90000 203

The Chicago based Lincoln Trio turns their creative radar to chamber music by two now virtually unknown Chicago composers, Ernst Bacon (1898-1990) and Leo Sowerby (1895-1968). (Sowerby’s music has enjoyed no fewer than 7 CD releases on this label.) Both of these composers were rather prolific and well known during their lifetimes but, for whatever reason, they are no longer household names. These are composers who wrote in a largely post-romantic idiom which one might translate as “audience friendly” and one might suggest that their home grown romanticism was eclipsed by modernism but these guys aren’t only audience friendly, these works have the weight of substance. This is not ear candy, this is serious music that reveals more depth and significance with each hearing.

On the surface these are simply two piano trios, a form which emerged in the early classical era and which continues today as a sort of genre on its own and generally is a work of three or four separate movements much like the form of a symphony or sonata. The first piece on the disc is Bacon’s trio from 1987, a late work in his oeuvre which is cast in no fewer than 7 movements, so there goes my generalization already.

The first movement, the longest of the seven, is marked “Lento” and is a slowly evolving movement which goes through many moods from quiet to intense. The second which is actually part of the first is a rather brief march tune and is followed by a slightly longer second movement entitled, “an easy walk”. The more somber mood returns in movement three entitled, “Gravely expressive”. It is followed by a more sprightly Allegro, a brief movement marked, “commodo”, and a finale which gets the blood flowing entitled, “Vivace, ma non presto.” It is difficult to characterize this piece in the context of Bacon’s other work since I’ve heard very little of his significant output but this work suggests that there’s more gold to be had in his compositional vaults.

The Sowerby Trio is from 1953 and is a large work clocking in at nearly 40 minutes. It is cast in the more or less classical tradition of three movements. The first two are large Brahmsian movements which are followed by a (somewhat) shorter finale. Cedille has revealed much of the rich legacy that Sowerby has left us and this trio serves to validate the choice of focusing on getting more of this man’s work to the ears of eager listeners. It is a major addition to the repertoire and this reviewer hopes that this recording may help this work to be a more regular part of live programming.

The trio discharges its duties with an amiable virtuosity which demonstrates their passion for this work. As usual, the recorded sound is top notch. This is a great chamber music recording as well as another fine document of Chicago’s rich musical history, world class music by world class performers.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s