Janoska Ensemble: Revolution


 

janoskarev

Deutsche Grammaphon 60257 725 9326

Not your typical Deutsche Grammaphon release, this disc is of a genre in which classical musicians toy with pop music arrangements (in this case two violins, piano, and bass) as well as a few showpieces.  Such novelties when done carelessly (evidence the plethora of string quartet arrangements of rock music) it can be tedious but with clever arrangements and energetic musicians they can be marvelously entertaining.  This disc is in the latter category.

This traverses some of the territory of the late great Yehudi Menuhin and his collaborations with the likes of Stephane Grappelli among others.  This spirit of exploring the fun side of classical music (so to say) is very much present here.  The virtuosity of the selections by Fritz Kreisler and Henryk Wieniawski  are contrasted with virtuosity of variations written and arranged by the Janoskas.  Add a cello and I’d love to hear these guys do the Schubert Trout Quintet.  They rock in their way.

Here are the track names:

The Marriage of Figaro (Mozart)

Yesterday (Lennon and McCartney)

Praeludium and Allegro in the style of G. Pugnani (Kreisler)

Hello Prince! (Roman Janoska)

Air (Bach)

Len’s Dance (Frantisek Janowska)

Melodie (Tchaikovsky)

Night and Day (Porter)

Penny Lane (Lennon and McCartney)

Variations on an Original Theme (Wieniawski)

Let it Be (Lennon and McCartney)

The ensemble consists of Ondrej Janoska, violin; Roman Janoska, violin; Frantisek Janoska, piano; and Julius Darvas, double bass.  Nothing truly “revolutionary” here except for the title but fun and entertainment certainly are.

 

Fatu Duo: Unusual and Beautiful Romantic Gems for Violin and Piano


fa2

Tzigane Music 192914643470

No, this is not your typical violin and piano recital disc.  At first hearing it conjured memories (seen on television) of Jascha Heifetz performing his unique selection of virtuosic and popular short works for violin and piano.  The spirit here is essentially the same but the choice of repertoire distinguishes this recording.  Its name “Treasures from home”.  Here they present a very personal selection of music from their Russian and Romanian backgrounds much as Heifetz chose his repertoire.

There are 13 tracks by 13 composers and I seriously doubt you will duplicate anything you may have currently in your collection.  This album is, in a way, an updating of one of those Heifetz recitals in spirit.  Here the focus is on music mostly from the ancestral lands of the performers which includes Russia, Romania, and related regions.  However it is important to view these choices as musical interests, not a nationalist statements.

Mention needs to be made of the intelligent choices made.  We get and Ave Maria but not Schubert’s or Bach/Gounod, we get one by Astor Piazzola.  The too seldom heard Meditation from Thais gets a gorgeous reading.  The Fritz Kreisler piece speaks to a violinist perhaps a half generation older than Heifetz whose tradition inspired Heifetz.  All in all a thoughtful but ultimately enjoyable selection.  This is virtually a calling card for some musicians who are worth watching.

My only complaint here is, perhaps, a minor one.  There are few notes and nothing on the background of any of the composers.  Rather than try to correct this I will simply provide a list of the compositions recorded.  They do stand well on their own as compositions but listeners like your reviewer here thirst for more.  Anyway here is the list:

Jo Knümann: Rumanisch

Bela Kovacs: Sholom Alekhem Rov Friedman

John Williams: Schindler’s List Theme

Isidore Burdin/F. Dobrinescu: Hora Primaverii

Grigoras Dinicu: Hora Martisorului

Jules Massenet: Meditation from Thais

Matthew Jackfert: Hootenanny

Grigoras Dinicu: Ciocarlia

Antonio Bazzini: The Dance of the Goblins

Astor Piazzola: Ave Maria

Fritz Kreisler: Miniature Viennese March

Myroslav Skoric: Melodya

Vittorio Monti: Csardas

Williams, Kreisler, Massenet, and Piazzola are familiar names to this writer.  The rest I shall leave to the curious listener to learn more.  The end result, though, is a thoroughly enjoyable recital played with love and  passion.  It would be a nice addition to any collection of violin and piano chamber music.

 

 

Harold Meltzer: Wonderful New Chamber Music on Bridge


meltzersongs
Bridge 9513

This is the second Harold Meltzer (1966- ) disc to come across my desk in the last two months or so.  This time he is heard on the venerable Bridge label which produces a great deal of quality recordings of new and recent music.  This one contains four works spread over 15 tracks and, like his previous CD, includes some vocal music alongside two chamber music pieces without voice.

Meltzer seems to be one of a generation of composers who have absorbed many of the vast styles and methods which flowered in the twentieth century.  He is not easy to categorize except as a composer.  There are in his music gestures and ideas that span neo-romanticism, minimalism, etc. but he has a distinctive and very affecting style.

Meltzer’s ability to write for the human voice and these songs put this reviewer in the mind of composers like Ned Rorem.  I’m not saying he exactly sounds like Rorem, just that he is as effective in his writing.  Stylistically there is at times an almost impressionist feel in these songs and, while the piano accompaniment is wonderful, they almost beg to be orchestrated.

There are two song cycles on this disc, the first setting poems of Ted Hughes (Bride of the Island, 2016) and the second setting poems by Ohio poet James Wright (Beautiful Ohio, 2010).  Tenor Paul Appleby had his work cut out for him and he delivers wonderful performances with a voice that is well suited to lieder but clearly with operatic ability as well.  Pianist Natalya Katyukova handles the intricate accompaniments with deceptive ease in these cycles.

There are two chamber works on this disc.  The first is Aqua (2011-12) which is inspired by the architecture of the so-called Aqua building in Chicago by architect Jeanne Gang.  In a city known for its fine architecture this 2007 building manages to stand out in its uniqueness.  Need I say that his piece suggests impressionism.  It’s string writing is complex with a vast mixture of effects that, under the interpretive skill of the Avalon String Quartet, suggest movement in much the way the building itself does.  This is genius, the ability to mix all these string techniques into a coherent whole.  It is a basically tonal work and it is seriously engaging but listener friendly in the end.  

The second chamber work is a piece written for the 50th anniversary of the death of legendary violinist Fritz Kreisler.  As it happens the Library of Congress, who commissioned the piece, owns Kreisler’s Guarneri violin and it is they who commissioned this work.  Miranda Cuckson does the honors on violin ably accompanied by the trustworthy Blair McMillen.  To be sure some of Kreisler’s style is used here but this work, “Kreisleriana” (2012) comes across as more than an homage, more a work informed by Kreisler.  It’s a really entertaining piece too.

Thanks in particular to Bridge Records for releasing this.  Bridge is one of those labels whose every release deserves at least a bit of attention.  This time I think they’ve found a fascinating voice in Meltzer’s works.  Now how about some orchestral work?

Jennifer Koh, Putting Tchaikovsky in Context


tchaikoh

Cedille CDR 166

Let me start here with a confession:  I have never been a real big fan of the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto.  However I am a huge fan of Jennifer Koh and of Cedille Records in their intelligent productions which place music like this in a more proper context.  The usual pairings of this concerto with Brahms or Beethoven only seem to highlight the distinct difference in style rather than a context more conducive to the appreciation of the music. Another problem with Tchaikovsky is that his reputation tends to hang on the 1812 Overture, the Violin Concerto, the first Piano Concerto and the last three Symphonies.  He wrote a lot more than that (including ten operas and three string quartets).

Now with that bit of whining out of the way let’s take a look at the recording at hand.  Jennifer Koh is one of the shining lights of contemporary violin soloists and that alone should be sufficient recommendation to listen to any of her recordings or performances. She holds a special place in this reviewer’s heart for her attention and expertise with contemporary music and for having performed the solo violin part in the most recent production of Philip Glass’ Einstein on the Beach.  In costume with a shaggy wig she brought new and highly virtuosic life to that obbligato violin part.

It is her virtuosity and her perspective as one of the more recent generations of artists to wield this classic string instrument that holds the main interest here.  The Tchaikovsky concerto has been the darling of all the great violinists from Heifetz and Kreisler to Milstein and Stern. I suppose that every violinist must confront this work at some point and it is a genuine challenge as well as a showpiece for virtuosity.

The other works on this disc (which are presented chronologically) are the Serenade Melancolique Op. 26 (1875), the Valse-Scherzo Op. 34 (1877) followed by the Concerto Op. 35 (1878) and finally the Souvenir d’un lieu cher Op. 42 (1878, originally for violin and piano orchestrated by Alexander Glazounov and published in 1896).  Hearing this concerto in the context of the composer’s other works for violin and orchestra does more clearly delineate the composer’s process.

In addition to providing a complete accounting of Tchaikovsky’s violin and orchestra music listeners are able to hear the interpretation by this wonderful artist.  Indeed she does truly grasp the grand romantic sweep of the concerto and the more intimate shorter works. Let me say too that if you like the concerto you will also find much delight in the shorter works which frame it on this disc.  Her virtuosity shines and Koh’s ability to handle romantic as well as modern repertoire certainly mark her as a versatile modern master.

Of course one can’t miss the powerful contribution of the orchestra in considering these performances.  The Odense Symphony Orchestra (Denmark) is absolutely stunning in its clarity and drive.  The conductor Alexander Vedernikov is of Russian musical royalty (both his parents were accomplished musicians) and was the conductor of the Bolshoi from 2001-2009.  He is definitely a name to follow and his feel for this music of his homeland is most genuine and exciting.

This truly excellent recording is produced by Grammy winning veteran producer Judith Sherman.  Session engineering is by Viggo Mangor with post-production and editing respectively by Bill Maylone and Jeanne Velonis.  Audiophiles might even want to have this disc for the sound alone.  It’s that good.