A Tale of Ice and Fire: Dan Lippel’s “Mirrored Spaces”


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This double album by guitarist, composer, producer, etc. Dan Lippel is sort of his Yellow Brick Road, an album which listeners of a certain age know well.  Elton John’s album was more about dropping the shackles of adolescence and conformity but Mirrored Spaces is more about setting aside the shackles of Lippel’s very busy life with ICE (The International Contemporary Ensemble), Flexible Music, and the daunting task of producing for (the also very busy and wonderful) New Focus Records.  Here he presents a virtual manifesto of works for solo guitar with electronics which, if only by proximity of release date, suggests a comparison with Jennifer Koh’s Limitless.

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Promo photo from the artist’s web site

The present disc is at once a virtual CV of his interests as performer and composer as well as a forward looking compilation by which future new chamber music with guitar will be compared.  It is a collection which looks like he culled the best of his current working repertoire to present a sort of photograph of his vision.

The two discs are actually an overwhelming listening experience of new material.  Here are the tracks:

01 Amorphose 2
Amorphose 2
Daniel Lippel, guitarPhilip White, live electronics 7:13
02 Aphorisms: Whom the Gods…
Aphorisms: Whom the Gods…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 0:52

Mirrored Spaces

Orianna Webb (b. 1974)/Daniel Lippel (b. 1976)

Daniel Lippel, guitar
03 I. Refracted
I. Refracted
4:41
04 II. Sturdy
II. Sturdy
4:03
05 III. Cadences
III. Cadences
4:17
06 IV. Reflected
IV. Reflected
2:00
07 V. Rondo
V. Rondo
4:20
08 VI. Song
VI. Song
4:58
09 Aphorisms: When Music Itself…
Aphorisms: When Music Itself…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 0:57
10 Descent
Descent
Daniel Lippel, guitar 10:34
11 Aphorisms: Solon the Lawmaker…
Aphorisms: Solon the Lawmaker…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 0:45
12 Primo cum lumine solis
Primo cum lumine solis
Daniel Lippel, guitar 3:43
13 Aphorisms: It Needs a Body…
Aphorisms: It Needs a Body…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 1:01
14 Like Minds
Like Minds
Daniel Lippel, guitar 11:48
15 From Scratch
From Scratch
Daniel Lippel, guitarSergio Kafejian, electronics 11:18
16 Aphorisms: Whosoever is Delighted…
Aphorisms: Whosoever is Delighted…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 1:23
17 Detroit Rain Song Graffiti
Detroit Rain Song Graffiti
Daniel Lippel, guitar 6:02
18 Aphorisms: We Seek Destruction…
Aphorisms: We Seek Destruction…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 1:11

Partita

Douglas Boyce (b. 1970)

Daniel Lippel, guitar
19 I. Cumiliform
I. Cumiliform
2:50
20 II. Galante
II. Galante
1:37
21 III. Empfindsamer (offstage)
III. Empfindsamer (offstage)
3:10
22 IV: Air de cour
IV: Air de cour
3:15
23 V. Brise
V. Brise
2:32
24 Aphorisms: There is No Excellent Beauty…
Aphorisms: There is No Excellent Beauty…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 1:56
25 Joie Divisions
Joie Divisions
Daniel Lippel, guitar 6:54
26 Aphorisms: Man Comes into the World…
Aphorisms: Man Comes into the World…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 1:19
27 Arc of Infinity
Arc of Infinity
Daniel Lippel, guitarChristopher Bailey, electronics 16:27
28 Aphorisms: Love is Necessarily…
Aphorisms: Love is Necessarily…
Daniel Lippel, guitar 1:43
29 Scaffold (live)
Scaffold (live)
Daniel Lippel, guitar 7:00

Its easy to see the richness and complexity of this release from the track listing alone.  Having already demonstrated his facility with minimalist classics like his wonderful recording of Steve Reich’s Electric Counterpoint he presents selections from what appears to be his current active repertoire.  It is a joy to see the diversity of composers he has chosen.  Clearly he confronts the new and technically challenging works with the same zeal with which he approaches his various other responsibilities as performer and producer.  We even get to hear some of his chops as a composer in the live recording of Scaffold as well as his collaborative work with Oriana Webb on the eponymous Mirrored Spaces.  These are unusual works, not the “usual suspects” nor the latest rage but new and interesting music.  Even the presentation of Kyle Bartlett’s pithy Aphorisms are scattered among the other tracks like pepper on your salad at a restaurant (personally my obsessive nature wants to re-order these tracks in sequence) demonstrating a sensitivity to alternate ways to present music.

I have at best a passing knowledge of most of these composers having heard some of the work of Douglas Boyce and some of Kyle Bartlett.  I know Ryan Streber via his work as a recording engineer.  the rest of the names are new to these ears.  And that is exactly the point of this wonderful collection.  I really can’t say much useful about the individual pieces except to say that they are compelling listening.  The liner notes included in the CD release are useful and informative.  (Now last I looked the CD version is not available on Amazon so you will have to go to Bandcamp to order it but I highly recommend it for the notes alone.)  Many of these pieces will have a significant performance life and you heard them here first.  Much as Jennifer Koh defines new collaborative adventures in Limitless with her trusty violin, Lippel brings his axe down on some challenging but substantive music in this forward looking collection.

Christopher Bailey: Glimmering Webs, New Piano Music


glimwebs

I admit to some trepidation when I received this 2 disc set of piano music by an unfamiliar composer.  Even in the best of circumstances the “double album” concept can be a trying thing even to fans of a given artist.  I think I recall some similar trepidation confronting the newly released Elton John Yellow Brick Road double album.  I invoke some pop sensibility here in part for humor but also because that sensibility is one of the many threads that imbue this rather massive collection of pieces.

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Christopher Bailey

Christopher Bailey is a freelance composer who holds degrees from Eastman (BA, 1995) and Columbia University (MA, 1997 and PhD, 2002).  This is the eighth disc to contain his music though only the second to be dedicated entirely to his works (and his first double album).

The first disc is a journey of styles ranging from electroacoustic music (like the opening track which resembles the work of Mario Davidovsky at times) to several whose inspiration seems to venture closer to that of Pierre Boulez and ends with a lengthy sort of post minimalist piece appropriately titled, Meditation.  The composer says in his liner notes that this piece is his homage to “ambient music” and in particular, Harold Budd. The second track is a piece which is a sort of deconstruction of a Hall and Oates song, the pop sensibility to which I referred earlier.  And, yes, there is some nod to microtonalism as well.  Can you say eclectic?

The second disc contains the large Piano Sonata and a host of smaller works in various styles ranging from neo-classical to microtonal.

In the rambling liner notes the composer provides useful clues as to the genesis and intent of some of his ideas.  One need not read the notes to appreciate the music but the clarity that they provide was useful to this listener. More notes would have been appreciated though.  The composer’s and the pianists’ web sites are certainly useful but I doubt that the average listener will spend that much time researching these things and is then left with gaps in information and consequently in understanding.

The composition dates here range from 1994 to 2013 and embrace a wide swath of styles all with a strongly virtuosic aspect.  The second disc starts with the brief Prelude-Fantasy on the So-Called Armageddon Chord (2011).  The title is almost longer than the piece and, while it’s a fine work, the placement at the beginning of the disc preceding the major opus of his four movement Piano Sonata (1994/1996/2006) is a bit confusing.

I don’t mean to quibble with such things as track order and such but I was left with a sense of difficulty focusing.  Here is a large collection of music which ranges through pretty much the entire gamut of the last 200 years of music and it is presented en masse.  I think some re-ordering might have been helpful but that is one of the difficulties with multiple disc issues.  I listened numerous times to these discs and find the sheer volume and diversity a bit overwhelming.  It is as though this is too much for a single release.

Bailey says that the sonata is an homage to Stravinsky and those neo-classical elements are certainly clear but this listener hears some ghosts of Charles Ives and the polystylism of Alfred Schnittke as well.  The Sonata seems to be the highlight here.   It is wonderfully complex, kaleidoscopic, loaded with quotation, even grandiose at times, but eminently listenable and it is a highly entertaining piece also because of it’s virtuosity which is ably handled by the performer.

There are apparently three pianists on this recording, Jacob Rhodebeck, Shiau-Uen Ding and Augustus Arnone.  The problem is that it is not clear from the labeling or the notes who plays what.  This is actually a fascinating and engaging collection, well played, but I was surprised to be unable to attribute the various virtuosities to the deserving performers.

The recording, mastered by Silas Brown, is as good as it gets.  Overall quite a collection but one that left me with many questions as well.  Perhaps that was, at least partly, the intent but it is my hope that these ambiguities will not distract the listener and that more releases will be forthcoming.  This is very interesting music deserving of serious attention.