Only the Lonely, Frank Horvat’s “Music for Self Isolation”


Centrediscs CMCCD 28521

I’ve only heard one other Frank Horvat recording, his String Quartet “For Those Who Died Trying“, and homage to slain social justice activists in Thailand. It is cast in some 35 short movements, each based on the name of one of those activists. Horvat’s work is frequently characterized by references to social justice issues.

The present disc contains 32 short pieces named for the musician (or, in a couple of cases, musicians) who play these instrumental soliloquies apparently in a cavernous concert hall, Roy Thomson Hall in Toronto. The little booklet included with this CD contains the texts for the 5 tracks which include singers. The booklet gives a brief description of the project but no further details regarding compositional processes, etc.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not complaining (as I frequently do) about the lack of details in these liner notes. The music seems to speak for itself, a mix of melancholy and yearning but also with just a dash optimism. Doubtless there are stories behind the compositions and the performances but, listening to the music, this writer found it curiously comforting and even nostalgic.

The cover photo and the nature of the project put this writer in the mind of the Canadian film by Don McKellar, Last Night (1998), a beautiful film (and a personal favorite) about an impending apocalypse and how it affects the various characters. One scene is filmed in what appears to be the same hall in which this project was recorded. The film achieves similar emotional goals of expressing sadness, isolation, and just a little hope.

Dennis Patterson’s engineering captures the apparently deeply felt performances and creates an ambience that seems to enhance the composer’s intent. The photography by Melissa Calixte included in the booklet by graphic designer Lisa Horvat show the large lonely stage of said concert hall. One can imagine the loneliness of playing in such a large space in a context which usually includes an audience. Now, in these plague years, the audience is you, the listener. Just listen and let the music take you within yourself. You won’t be disappointed.